Good for the Planet

A SUSTAINABLE SUPPLY CHAIN FROM FIELD TO FORK

For Barilla means:
For Barilla, this means

Improving the efficiency of production processes in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and water consumption.

For Barilla, this means

Promoting more sustainable agricultural and farming practices for all of the Group's strategic supply chains.

Good for the Planet

By seeking out excellent ingredients for its recipes, the Barilla Group not only brings high quality to consumers, but also ensures responsible production that takes care of the Planet's resources. The rights of the people working in the supply chains, and the impact of production on animal welfare and the environment, are therefore key factors that underpin Barilla's purchasing decisions.

The Barilla Code of Sustainable Agriculture

Our constant commitment to developing a responsible supply chain, over the years, has culminated in the formulation of the Barilla Code of Sustainable Agriculture, which establishes a set of principles aimed at ensuring sustainable purchasing management practices and ethical relationships with all players involved in the supply chain.

In particular, the Code of Sustainable Agriculture is based on five core principles:

  1. Seeking efficiency and competitiveness of the productive system - for Barilla, achieving high levels of efficiency in agricultural practices is the starting point for developing a sustainable supply chain, because it increases the competitiveness of all players in the sector, while reducing negative impact on the economy, the environment and society.   
  2. Safeguarding business integrity and applying the Code of Ethics - the Group encourages the use of long-term contracts with its suppliers, so as to ensure stable earnings and promote sustainable farming in terms of quality, food safety and environmental impact. All Barilla contracts with suppliers, furthermore, are based on explicit acceptance of the principles and values set out in the Code of Ethics.
  3. Promoting health and food safety - to ensure the high quality of its products, Barilla monitors the risk profile of suppliers in relation to the food safety of raw materials. All ingredients are sourced exclusively from suppliers who are periodically assessed and certified in relation to the health and safety of the foods they produce.
  4. Reducing environmental impact - Barilla requires all suppliers to operate with full respect for the environment and the compliance with national and international environmental legislation. In order to monitor the impact of its supply chains across the entire product life cycle, from field to fork, the Group uses the Life Cycle Assessment method (LCA), taking into account Carbon Footprint, Water Footprint and Ecological Footprint.
  5. Listening and collaboration for continuous development - the Group works in partnership with various stakeholders, including universities, NGOs, institutions and trade associations, to identify emerging risks and opportunities in the agricultural arena. In doing so, Barilla intends to promote a shared development pathway designed to yield benefits for all concerned.

The principles of the code of sustainable agriculture are applied to all projects implemented under the Barilla Sustainable Farming (BSF) program, which promotes the adoption of new farming techniques in strategic supply chains in order to produce healthier, higher-quality products, protect the environment and safeguard the social and economic conditions of farmers involved in the supply chains.

Analyzing the environmental impact of products

To improve the sustainability of its products, Barilla measures their environmental impact across their entire life cycle, using the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method. LCA analyses take account of every stage of production, from the cultivation of raw materials, to the processing and packaging of products, and the distribution, use and final disposal of packages. This enables Barilla to accurately assess the environmental impact its of products in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, water consumption and land use.

71% of our production volumes are covered by LCA analysis

Barilla publishes the results of the analyses conducted on each product, in the form of Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) - an international, public analysis and communication instrument that complies ISO 14025 and is checked by an independent third-party body.

61 EPDs were published, covering 69% of our 2017 production

Environmental impact of ingredients purchased in 2017

 

CARBON FOOTPRINT
kt CO2eq 

WATER FOOTPRINT
mm3

ECOLOGICAL FOOTPRINT
Global ha

Durum wheat 

844

1,976

1,179

Common wheat

170

367

179

Rye

21

20

25

Tomatoes

22

2

9

Palm oil

<1

<1

<1

Sunflower oil

95

113

85

Colza oil

19

35

19

Eggs

105

69

58

Sugar

1

1

<1

Cacao

6

345

84

Beef

17

19

7

Pork

7

41

2

Wild-caught fish

<1

-

1

Animal fat

40

49

13

Dairy products

82

100

27

Total impact

1,429

3,137

1,688

For many years, Barilla's sustainable farming project has been promoting the development of economically, environmentally and socially responsible agricultural practices, by designing numerous initiatives involving the Group's strategic supply chains and all other supply chains associated with potentially critical social and environmental considerations.

Year after year, Barilla has succeeded in increasing the share of responsibly farmed raw materials it purchases, in line with the principles laid down in the Barilla Code of Sustainable Agriculture.

Shares of responsibly purchased strategic raw materials 2016 vs. 2017

Shares of responsibly purchased strategic raw materials

Responsibly purchased raw materials

 

TOTAL TONNES
PURCHASED

TONNES SELECTED 
FROM RESPONSIBILITY 
MANAGED SUPPLY CHAINS

SHARE OF PURCHASES 
SELECTED FROM RESPONSIBILITY 
MANAGED SUPLLY CHAINS, 
OUT OF TOTAL PURCHASES

 

2016

2017

t, 

Strategic raw materials

Durum wheat

1,167,835

1,188,000

417,977

35%

Durum wheat semolina

215,000

334,000

203,000

61%

Common wheat

82,356

81,151

10,200

13%

Common wheat flour

363,941

368,331

141,931

39%

Rye

58,082

58,006

0

0%

Tomatoes

53,674

62,898

54,418

87%

Palm oil

18,249

154

154

100%

Sunflower oil

20,003

35,613

15,488

43%

Colza oil

5,998

8,030

0

0%

Eggs

23,691

24,668

23,144

94%

Raw materials from supply chains with critical social and environmental aspects

Sugar

1,005

1,063

1,063

100%

Cacao

11,455

12,265

1,411

12%

Beef

706

723

723

100%

Pork

1,960

2,024

2,024

100%

Chicken

0

16

0

0%

Wild-caught fish

87

73

73

100%

Animal fats

7,313

7,208

0

0%

Dairy products

9,951

9,002

0

0%

Total

2,040,302

2,192,661

866,312

40%

DURUM WHEAT: A STRATEGIC RAW MATERIAL FOR THE GROUP

Durum wheat is a strategic raw material for the Group. So to ensure that the quality of the durum wheat used in our products is never less than excellent, and to promote the development of the farms that produce it, the company has implemented projects aimed at promoting the responsible development of the supply chain in every country in which it operates. Barilla has taken special care, in this respect, to appreciate the local peculiarities of each country and to establish lasting partnerships with a variety of local partners.

DURUM WHEAT PURCHASED     

TOTAL TONNES
PURCHASED

TONNES PURCHASED
 FROM THE LOCAL MARKET

TONNES PURCHASED
UNDER CULTIVATION CONTRACTS

 

t.

t.

%

t.

%

Italy

756,000

671,000

89%

432,000

57%

Greece

65,000

62,000

95%

18,800

29%

Turkey

139,000

127,000

91%

-

-

North America

228,000

228,000

100%

-

-

Total

1,188,000

1,088,000

92%

450,800

38%

Durum wheat semolina   

 

TOTAL TONNES
PURCHASED

TONNES PURCHASED
FROM LOCAL MARKET

 

t.

t.

%

Italy

127,000

76,200

60%

North America

90,000

90,000

100%

Mexico

78,000

78,000

100%

Russia

34,000

34,000

100%

Total

329,000

278,200

85%

Italy

During the year, Barilla signed a new durum wheat purchasing agreement with suppliers in the Emilia Romagna, Marche, Puglia and Campania regions of Italy, and extended the duration of the contract to three years. The agreement stems from the Group's desire to enable the farms in its supply chain to achieve higher earnings and price stability, and to plan their equipment and resource requirements on a more secure basis, giving rise to major benefits in terms of the quality of the durum wheat they produce.

By entering into three-year contracts, furthermore, Barilla can enhance the involvement of farmers, and fast-track the sustainability paths it is promoting, by disseminating shared codes of practice and a decision-making support system, so as to provide farmers with practical support in their drive to reduce CO2 emissions, optimize their use of fertilizers and water resources.

432,000 tonnes of durum wheat were purchased under three-year cultivation contracts

In parallel with the adoption of these commercial contracts with farmers, since 2009 Barilla has been working with HORTA, a spin-off of the Catholic University of Piacenza, on the development and continuous improvement of sustainable farming practices, with the aid of two tools: the Decalogue and Granoduro.net®.

The "Barilla Decalogue for the Sustainable Cultivation of Durum Wheat" is a manual, shared with farmers, which sets out the most efficient and sustainable agricultural practices, and has been validated over the years by tests on field in different parts of Italy.

granoduro.net® is a support system for farmers, designed to help them with technical decisions, such as fertilization and disease prevention treatments, on the basis of meteorological data, soil characteristics, mathematical models and field observations.

Durum wheat purchased from farmers in Italy who use the granoduro.net system

 

TONNES OF WHEAT CULTIVATED
WITH THE SUPPORT OF granoduro.net

NUMBER OF FARMERS AND FARMS 
THAT USE granoduro.net

Northern Italy

91,675

593

Central Italy

104,938

768

Southern Italy

33,363

687

Total

229,976

2,048

Lastly, to develop synergies between different supply chains, Barilla has also launched a pilot project aimed at integrating the cultivation of durum wheat and sugar beet. During the year, thanks to a partnership with the Italian Beet Producers Cooperative (COPROB) and Italia Zuccheri, 31 sugar beet growers integrated their crops with durum wheat, cultivated in accordance with the Barilla principles of sustainable agriculture.

As a result, a total of 240,000 tonnes of more sustainably cultivated durum wheat were harvested in 2017, as against 190,000 tonnes in 2016.

240,000 tonnes of sustainable durum wheat was cultivated in 2017

BARILLA’S IMPORTS AND MAIN QUALITY PARAMETERS

Imports of durum wheat in Italy are carried out mainly for quantitative reasons, as the total production covers just 65/70% of the needs. Quite often the quality of national durum wheat is not sufficient and suitable for achieving the quality performance required for high quality Italian pasta. In particular, Barilla, while favoring national durum wheat, imports about 20-30% of its needs every year from European or extra-European countries depending on quality. Normally, high-protein grain is usually imported from France, Australia or the United States, to guarantee the quality performance demanded by our consumers. Over the years, depending on the quality and quantity of the Italian crop, we can also resort to imports from other countries such as Greece or Spain.

The protein content is the most important feature to define the quality of the grain as a high protein level, together with the quality of gluten, favors the keeping in cooking. In our purchases we try to maximize these features. The amber color of the grain determines the color of the dough and a low ash content allows to optimize the grinding process.

Touch on the image to zoom

 

Barilla’s Imports and Main Quality Parameters

Greece

In line with its work in Italy, Barilla continued its partnerships with various actors and agencies in Greece, for the sustainable development of the supply chain. In particular, we continued our partnership with the University of Thessaly, which gave rise to the formulation of new farming tools and techniques designed to reduce impact on natural resources.

The year also saw the completion of the test phase connected with the drafting of guidelines for sustainable durum wheat farming in Greece. The completion of field-testing led to the publication of 12 principles and to their dissemination in conjunction with the respective cultivation contracts and granoduro.net decision-making system. On the strength of this initiative, 218 farmers sowed the first 2,200 hectares of land in accordance with the new Barilla standards

15,000 tonnes of durum wheat were purchased through cultivation contracts 2,200 hectares were sown in accordance with Barilla sustainable agriculture guidelines

Turkey

Barilla launched two specific projects in Turkey. Firstly, the Group published and distributed the first version of its sustainable agriculture manual, in partnership with the Bahri Dağdaş International Agricultural Research Institute.

Secondly, Barilla formed a partnership with the Namik Kemal Institute in Thrace, with a view to implementing projects that help create a supply chain model in line with the models already developed in Italy and Greece.

Russia

Barilla's durum wheat supply chain in Russia is still in the early stages of development. To accelerate its progress, Barilla launched a study and monitoring project aimed at identifying the most efficient models of durum wheat cultivation in terms of agricultural yield and environmental sustainability. These tests are also intended to lay the foundations for drawing up a decalogue of sustainable agriculture for farmers in Russia's durum wheat supply chain.

North America

For many years, farmers in the American and Canadian durum wheat supply chain have been complementing their agricultural processes with technical decision-making support systems similar to the ones developed by Barilla in its European supply chains.

In the farming regions of North America, the Group continued its partnerships with research bodies and local partners in 2017, with a view to enhancing the agronomic knowledge of farmers and developing new sustainable farming techniques

In conjunction with the University of North Dakota, Barilla sponsored the publication of a comprehensive and authoritative agronomic guide covering the most innovative farming techniques for the cultivation of durum wheat.After two years of field-testing, this guide was made available online for the benefit of all durum wheat farmers in the Country.

In conjunction with the University of North Dakota, Barilla sponsored the publication of a comprehensive and authoritative agronomic guide covering the most innovative farming techniques for the cultivation of durum wheat. After two years of field-testing, this guide was made available online for the benefit of all durum wheat farmers in the Country.

Lastly, in Montana, Barilla supported the application of a digital platform called Agrible across the durum wheat supply chain. The platform provides farmers with real-time crop data and helps them apply the most efficient and sustainable farming practices.

Common wheat
COMMON WHEAT

Common wheat flour is a key ingredient of Barilla's bakery products, which are produced mainly in Italy and France. The Group is supporting the development of a responsible supply chain in both countries, and encouraging the mills that produce flour for Barilla to adopt responsible production practices

In France, Barilla buys wheat flour exclusively from mills that manage their supply chains in their entirety, and are capable of providing a detailed analysis of the product life cycle of each crop.

In Italy, the Group conducted an LCA analysis, involving all the mills in Barilla's national common wheat flour supply chain, with a view to identifying the main areas for improvement in terms of sustainable development. In conjunction with HORTA, moreover, Barilla compiled a guide to the sustainable cultivation of common wheat, and made it available to farmers in the supply chain.

common wheat

   

 

TOTAL TONNES
PURCHASED

TONNES PURCHASED
FROM THE LOCAL MARKET

 

t.

t.

%

Italy

79,231

43,656

55%

Sweden

1,920

1,920

100%

Total

81,151

45,576

56%

common wheat flour

   

 

TOTAL TONNES
PURCHASED

TONNES PURCHASED
FROM THE LOCAL MARKET 

 

t.

t.

%

Italy

218,832

74,841

34%

France

122,699

122,541

100%

Germany

6,822

6,822

100%

Sveden

12,410

12,410

100%

Russia

7,568

7,568

100%

Total

368,331

224,182

61%

RYE
RYE

Rye is the core ingredient of crispbread, which is mainly produced in Sweden and Germany. Barilla's rye supply chain has a great environmental profile for two main reasons: firstly, rye farming does not require intensive use of water, fertilizers and other production inputs; and secondly, sustainable farming practices, in terms of yields and environmental integrity, are long-established in Germany and Sweden. Furthermore, Barilla undertakes to buy 100% of its rye supplies locally, unless adverse weather conditions make it necessary to source part of its requirement from other countries.

RYE AND RYE FLOUR

   

 

TOTAL TONNES
PURCHASED

TONNES PURCHASED
FROM THE LOCAL MARKET

 

t.

t.

%

Sweden

35,238

34,780

99%

Germany

21,813

21,813

100%

Italy

276

0

0%

France

394

0

0%

Russia

285

285

100%

Total

58,006

56,593

98%

TOMATOES
TOMATOES

In Italy and the United States, the main countries in which Barilla uses tomato for the production of ready sauces, the Group is committed to purchasing 100% of its raw materials locally, and to promoting initiatives for the sustainable development of the supply chains, in line with the Barilla Code of Sustainable Agriculture.

In Italy, Barilla buys most of its tomatoes from farms on the Pianura Padana that use mechanical harvesting techniques. In 2015, moreover, Barilla made a commitment to purchase tomatoes from producers holding Global G.A.P. certification, which testifies to their adherence to responsible, sustainable farming practices. As a result of its ongoing commitment on this front, Barilla purchased 84% of the tomatoes used in Italy from G.A.P. Global certified producers in 2017.

In the United States, the tomatoes purchased and processed by LiDestri on behalf of Barilla, are sourced from Californian producers who use mechanical harvesting methods. California's tomato processing industry, moreover, has strong cooperative links with farmers. Making use of these links, Barilla was able to conduct a Life Cycle Assessment in 2017, focusing on the harvests of the past decade. The study revealed a continuous reduction, over the years, in the use of water resources and the emission of greenhouse gases, in line with the criteria laid down in the Barilla Code of Sustainable Agriculture.

TOMATOES

   

 

TOTAL TONNES
PURCHASED

TONNES PURCHASED
FROM THE LOCAL MARKET

 

t.

t.

%

Italy

52,998

52,998

100%

North America

9,900

9,900

100%

Total

62,898

62,898

100%

VEGETABLE OILS
VEGETABLE OILS

Barilla uses vegetable oils for the production of numerous recipes. More specifically, the Group uses sunflower oil, colza oil and soybean oil.

With regard to sunflower oil, which is used mainly in Italy, the Group encourages the cultivation of sunflowers in rotation with durum wheat. Barilla has implemented numerous projects with farmers in this area, to establish the best farming practices for the cultivation of sunflowers, in accordance with the principles of the Barilla Code of Sustainable Agriculture. Barilla is also committed to purchasing sunflower oil from producers certified to CSQA standard DTP 112 or to ISCC standards, which guarantee sustainable production in environmental, economic and social terms, or which operate in accordance with HORTA's girasole.net platform. 43% of the sunflower oil currently purchased by Barilla is sourced from producers who meet these criteria

In Italy, Barilla also uses soybean oil in its recipes, which it procures entirely from producers who meet the requirements of CSQA standard DTP 112.

With regard to colza oil, which is especially widely used in France, Barilla is engaged in various projects, in conjunction with suppliers, to establish how to apply the Group's principles of sustainable agriculture.

vegetaBLE OILS

 

TOTAL TONNES
PURCHASED

TONNES PURCHASED
FROM THE LOCAL MARKET

 

t.

t.

%

Sunflower oil

35,606

5,388

15%

Colza oil

8,030

3,594

45%

Total

43,636

8,982

21%

Supply chains associated with potentially critical social considerations

The Group's overall procurement system includes supply chains associated with potentially critical social considerations.

With particular reference to its supply chains for cocoa, cane sugar and free gifts and promotional items, Barilla has identified potentially critical issues relating to the use of child labor and abuse of human rights.

The company therefore makes its purchases of these products exclusively from suppliers holding certifications issued by independent bodies specializing in the verification of compliance with international ethical and social standards. For example, Barilla requires all its suppliers of promotional gifts to hold SA 8000 certification, and its suppliers of cane sugar to hold SMETA or Bonsucro certification.

The Group also requires these suppliers to subscribe to the international Sedex platform, which is checked every quarter, in order to ensure rigorous compliance with the social and ethical standards that the Group strives to uphold. Lastly, the supplier's acceptance of the Barilla Code of Ethics is a binding requirement of all supply contracts.

 

2017

Suppliers deemed to be at potential risk of human rights violations (n.)

97

Suppliers subject to the risk of human rights violation, which hold independent third-party certifications or audit reports on compliance with ethical and social standards (n.)

84

Share of suppliers that hold independent third-party certifications or audit reports on compliance with ethical and social standards (%)

87%

Cacao

ICocoa is one of the Group's raw materials associated with potentially critical social and human rights considerations.

Through its Pan di Stelle brand, the Barilla Group has therefore embarked on a cooperation program with its main supplier, Barry Callebaut, and its Cocoa Horizon Foundation, with a view to supporting the cocoa supply chain in Africa. Over the course of the year, under the Pan di Stelle brand, this partnership spawned a project entitled A dream called cocoa, through which the Group undertakes to provide practical support for the Foundation in Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire.

The aim of the Foundation's projects is to improve the living conditions of cocoa farming communities by means of training courses, school-age educational support programs, initiatives aimed at reinforcing the role of women, and campaigns to protect children and health.

As a further step to protect the sustainability of the supply chain, the Barilla Group only sources cocoa from suppliers registered with the World Cocoa Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to fostering the responsible development of the industry.

12% of Barilla's cocoa supplies are procured in collaboration with the Cocoa Horizon foundation

Cane sugar

In view of the geographical areas in which it is produced, Barilla has also identified possible critical issues of a social nature relating to the sourcing of cane sugar. Barilla is committed to supporting the development of sustainable purchasing projects in partnership with major suppliers, and to setting ethical and environmental standards.

Barilla now buys cane sugar exclusively from SMETA (Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit) or Bonsucro certified suppliers.

100% of Barilla's cane sugar suppliers are certified to SMETA standards

ANIMAL WELFARE GUIDELINES

For many years, Barilla has been committed to ensuring that all suppliers of raw materials of animal origin not only comply with their legal obligations, but also meet the highest standards and criteria of animal welfare.

To support this commitment, the Group has worked alongside the organization Compassion in World Farming (CIWF), to draw up the Barilla Guidelines on Animal Welfare.

Barilla sets rigorous criteria for the purchase of eggs, meat and fish, and added chicken to this list in 2017.

The Group's guidelines acknowledge the vital importance of respecting the physical and mental wellbeing of animals, as well as their freedom to express species-specific behaviors. The Group therefore promotes respect for the Five Animal Freedoms: 

  • Freedom from hunger and thirst;
  • Freedom to have an appropriate physical environment;
  • Freedom from pain, injury and disease;
  • Freedom to express normal species-specific behavior;
  • Freedom from fear and distress.

The guidelines also lay down specific standards that livestock farmers involved in Barilla supply chains are obliged to meet. In particular:

  • All animals reared in the supply chains must have appropriate access to feed and water, thus fulfilling their needs and reducing aggression.
  • Stocking density must be such as to ensure the comfort and welfare of the animals, and allow the expression of species-specific behaviors.
  • Routine mutilation must be avoided, unless strictly necessary to safeguard the welfare of animals.
  • Animals must be transported in such a way as to minimize potential causes of stress and the duration of transit. Journeys of over 8 hours must be avoided at all times.
  • Animals must always be stunned before slaughter.
  • Antibiotics must always be used responsibly, by reducing their use where possible, and avoiding preventive use.
  • The use of growth hormones is not permitted.
  • Genetic engineering and the cloning of farm animals and/or their progeny is not permitted.
  • Selective breeding should be promoted on the basis of factors that enhance welfare and not merely to increase productivity.

Compliance with these standards, which is periodically checked by means of specific audits, forms an integral part of the contracts entered into with suppliers of eggs and meat. Should a supplier fail to meet these standards, Barilla draws up a realignment plan in relation to the severity of the case.

In order to train people in animal welfare, furthermore, Barilla has provided an internal training course, run by Compassion in World Farming (CIWF) for all employees involved in managing the supply chain, especially in Global Vendor Assurance and the Global Purchasing Unit.

eggs laid by cage-free hens
Eggs laid by cage-free hens

Barilla believes that keeping hens in confined spaces is detrimental to their welfare, and has therefore decided to phase out the practice from its supply chain, and switch to the exclusive use of eggs laid by cage-free hens by 2020.

All eggs used in "Le Emiliane" and "La Collezione" pasta and in Mulino Bianco and Pavesi bakery products have come from cage-free hens since 2012. Since the beginning of 2017, all eggs used in Harrys brand products have come from cage-free hens.

meat-based products
Meat-based products

In 2014, Barilla launched a major project with its suppliers of meat for the production of sauces and filled pasta, aimed at formulating new guidelines on animal welfare that cover all supplies of pork and beef. These guidelines comply with all the above-mentioned practices.

Suppliers signed the joint document in 2015 and the respective practices are already in the implementation phase. In 2018, moreover, Barilla will plan the final phase of implementation of all the practices for both supply chains.

The guidelines currently cover 100% of supplies of pork and beef for sauces and filled pasta produced in Italy (80% of the total quantity of meat used by Barilla).

chicken
Chicken

Working in partnership with its suppliers of chicken, Barilla will apply the standards classified as "best" in Compassion in World Farming's animal welfare matrix, at global level by 2024.

Regional commitment in the U.S.A.

In the United States, the Group will work in partnership with its suppliers of chicken to apply the following guidelines by 2024:

  • Transition to the breeds approved by the worldwide organization RSPCA or by the Global Animal Partnership (GAP) on the basis of measurable improvements to welfare.
  • Reduction of stocking density to a maximum of 1.2 kg/m2, and prohibition of the use of cages.
  • Rearing in enhanced environments that meet the new GAP standards, including bedding and the management of light.
  • Elimination of pre-stunning handling, and introduction of irreversible stunning systems.

Total weight of strategic raw materials locally purchased, by country of operation

raw materialTotal purchases (tonnes)
Bovine Meat723
Italy714
North America9
Pork meat2,024
Italy2,003
Nord America21
Chicken meat16
Italy16
Fished fish73
Italy73
Animal Fat7,208
Italy5,816
France1,392
Dairy Products9,951
Italy8,437
France92
Germany1,179
Sweden242
Total19,922

External awards

The global Business Benchmark on Farm Animal Welfare (BBFAW) presented its sixth report in London in February 2018. The number of companies analyzed rose from 99 in 2016 to 110 in 2017, in 18 different countries. BBFAW has examined the public communications of leading worldwide food companies and assessed how they manage and communicate their farm animal welfare policies and practices.


Barilla has consolidated its leadership on the Italian stage and stands out for its detailed, transparent communication on animal welfare, which not only sets out multiple tangible goals, but also reports the progress made, year by year, towards achieving them.


Supply chain for products of animal origin

Eggs

Barilla uses eggs for its bakery and fresh pasta products. In 2012, the Group embarked on the process of converting its supply chain, by phasing out its purchasing of eggs from cage-reared hens in favor eggs from cage-free hens. As a result of this commitment, all eggs purchased in France and Italy come from cage-free hens. Barilla has made significant progress in Brazil and Russia, where the adoption of new types of sustainable farming will reach completion in 2019. 

Barilla also conducts periodic on-site audits of its egg suppliers, to ensure that they are fully applying sustainable farming practices in line with the Group's animal welfare policy.

eggs

 

TOTAL TONNES
PURCHASED (2017)

TONNES PURCHASED
FROM LOCAL MARKET

PERCENTAGE OF EGGS
FROM CAGE-FREE HENS

 

tonnes

purchased locally

%

%

2017

2016

Italy

18,833

18,833

100%

100%

France

4,307

3,350

78%

100%

United States

181

181

100%

0%

Brazil

1,334

1,334

100%

0%

Russia

9

9

100%

0%

Total

24,664

23,698

96%

94%

In Brazil, Barilla has started the process of converting its supply chain to the sourcing of eggs laid by cage-free hens, and has started a preliminary analysis of its supply chain in Russia. In both countries, the Group expects to complete the process by 2019.

In the United States, Barilla has launched a project for the reformulation of products containing eggs, which will bring about a phased reduction in the use of this ingredient. The remaining volumes will be sourced entirely from cage-free poultry farms over the course of 2019.

Lastly, Barilla conducts periodic audits on all the cage-free poultry farms it uses, to ensure that they are properly aligned with alternative rearing systems. To date, these audits have been carried out on European suppliers, as these are the only ones that have completed the process of conversion to cage-free rearing. In non-European countries, the Group uses suppliers who adhere to nationally recognized farm audit schemes. Where no national schemes exist, an Animal Welfare Officer is appointed to conduct audits of a sample of farmers, to ensure that their practices are in line with a recognized guarantee scheme.

Pork and beef

Pork and beef are core ingredients of Barilla's ready ragout sauce and filled pasta products in Italy. In line with its animal welfare policy, the Group sources its meat from producers who uphold the five freedoms of animal welfare.

Over the year, Barilla completed an analysis of its meat supply chain with a view to identifying possible areas for improvement, in line with the parameters included in the Business Benchmark on Farm Animal Welfare (BBFAW). The analysis revealed improvements in alignment with BBFAW requirements, and where standards diverged, Barilla undertook to draw up an improvement plan in 2018, to be implemented in conjunction with farmers over the next few years.

With regard to the sourcing of pork, the Group embarked on a joint process, involving Compassion in World Farming and Barilla's Italian suppliers, aimed at eliminating the practice of docking the tails of pigs along the supply chain. This process is designed improve animal welfare, raise awareness of the issue among farmers, and promote the development of alternative farming practices that reduce the incidence of cannibalism and aggression among animals. 

After an initial phase of monitoring and improvement of environmental standards on all pig farms, Barilla involved farmers in specific training sessions on best practices in long-tailed pig farming.

In parallel, between late 2016 and early 2017, the Group carried out tests and assessments on the best materials for enhancing the farm environment, with a view to meeting the behavioral needs of animals to best effect, and prevent cases of aggression. Over the next few years, Barilla will actively cooperate with its suppliers to implement these livestock farming standards across its entire supply chain by 2019.

THE BUSINESS BENCHMARK ON FARMED ANIMAL WELFARE
During 2017, Barilla conducted a survey, involving Italian meat suppliers, aimed at checking their alignment with the parameters set down in the Business Benchmark on Farmed Animal Welfare (BBFAW). The analysis yielded the following results:

Pork

- Gestation crates for sows are used for the first 4 weeks of gestation, after which all animals are transferred to collective pens for the remaining period.
- 50% of the animals bred are not subject to tail docking.
- All pigs are transported from the farm to the slaughter houses in less than 8 hours, including loading and unloading from vehicles.
- All pork used in Barilla products comes from animals that are effectively stunned before slaughter.

Beef

- All beef cattle are transported from the farm to the abattoir in less than 8 hours, including loading and unloading from vehicles.
- All beef used in Barilla products comes from animals that are effectively stunned before slaughter.


The results of the analysis carried out will also be verified, over the course of 2018, with the aid of an independent third-party body, and an improvement plan for 2020 will be drawn up.

Sustainable management of packaging materials

Packaging plays an essential role in the food business, because it protects the product, preserves it over time and enables it to be consumed in a place other than its place of production.

To promote the environmental sustainability of its product packaging, Barilla Group has published a document entitled Barilla Principles on sustainable packaging, which is available on www.barillagroup.com. The requirements established by these principles include the following:

  • a reduction in the amount of packaging materials
  • the use of recyclable packaging
  • the use of materials sourced from responsibly managed forests
  • validation of the choice of technical packaging solutions by means of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA).

Building on the excellent results achieved over the years by following the Principles on sustainable packaging, Barilla Group decided to update this document in 2017, by introducing an additional concept of sustainability and raising the bar even higher. As a result, the goal of zero-waste packaging, which can be achieved through recyclability and reduction at source, has been complemented with a longer-term goal defined as zero-impact packaging, which is achievable through the use of renewable or recycled resources for the production of packaging materials.

Product packages

Barilla has established clear criteria to ensure responsible sourcing of the paper and cardboard used in its product packaging, by using supply chain managed in accordance with FSC or PEFC standards. These standards ensure sustainable forest management practices, geared towards environmental protection, respect for human rights and cultural traditions, and promotion of the economic sustainability of forestry operations.

Raw materials used for packaging 

 

2017

2016

Flexible film (t.)

23,695

19,010

Glass (t.)

58,046

54,745

Paper and cardboard for packaging (t.)

137,027

118,265

Paper and cardboard for packaging certified to FSC, PEFC and SFI standards (%)

99.0%

98.8%

The Group is also committed to ensuring that its packaging is recyclable, preferably by using recyclable materials, where the organoleptic characteristics of the product permit. To facilitate correct, differentiated disposal of packaging by consumers, furthermore, Barilla has included a range of recycling icons, which now appear on its packages.

Post-consumption recovery of packaging

  

 

2017

2016

Recyclable packages placed on the market

99%

98,7%

Packages marked with directions on how to recycle

99%

99%

Packages produced with recycled material

37%

45%

Nel corso dell’anno il Gruppo Barilla ha aderito a due importanti iniziative legate alla promozione del riciclo delle confezioni dei prodotti:

logo sustainable packaging

  • Barilla è divenuta membro del Sustainable Packaging Coalition, un gruppo di lavoro che coinvolge produttori, distributori, enti pubblici e esponenti del mondo accademico, con l’obiettivo di diffondere pratiche di utilizzo di materiali da confezionamento più sostenibili. 

logo how2recycle

  • Il Gruppo ha aderito al sistema di etichettatura statunitense How2Recylce, che promuove la diffusione di una comunicazione chiara e semplice ai consumatori in relazione al riciclaggio delle confezioni dei prodotti.

Sustainable production management at Barilla

Barilla Group makes continuous efforts to reduce the environmental footprint of its production processes by managing and monitoring the energy resources used at its plants, the greenhouse gases emitted, and their water consumption and waste production.

For this reason, the Group has had solid environmental management systems to ISO 14001 and energy resource control systems to ISO 50001 in place for many years.

93% of production volumes were made in facilities with ISO:14001 certification.

Production sites certifications

Production sites certifications

With a view to upholding transparency and providing precise information about the environmental impact of its production processes, Barilla subscribes to the initiatives of the Carbon Disclosure Project. This independent international organization fosters synergies between the financial and the business world, aimed at monitoring and valuing efforts to minimize climate change and to make responsible, sustainable use of water resources. In particular, Barilla responds to the CDP Supply Chain Water and Climate and CDP Forest questionnaires.

Focus on reducing energy consumption and emission

Barilla strives to improve its environmental profile by means of a substantial investment plan aimed at the continuous modernization of production facilities and the adoption of innovative, high-efficiency technologies. During the year, the Group allocated over 5.4 million euros to spending and invest on environmental preservation and protection initiatives.

5.4 million euros were allocated to spending and invest on environmental preservation and protection initiatives

In Italy, France, Turkey, Greece and the United States, for example, under the "ESP Energy Saving Project", the Group took further steps to reduce the energy consumption of its production plants, including:

  • Replacing burners, improving the thermal insulation of machinery and introducing systems for the reduction and recovery of heat losses;
  • Installing and automating high-efficiency chiller units, compressors and air conditioning systems;
  • Installing new LED lighting systems.

INVESTMENTS IN THE RUBBIANO SAUCE PRODUCTION PLANT

In 2017, Barilla made an investment aimed at doubling the production capacity of the Rubbiano sauce production plant and introducing new technologies to improve the efficiency of production processes, while reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.

The majority of this investment was channeled into implementing mechanical technologies and ICT infrastructures in line with the Industry 4.0 model. These innovations will reduce the environmental impact of the plant, by reducing CO2 emissions and water consumption by an estimated 7% and 9% respectively.

Energy consumption

On the back of these changes, the Group kept its energy consumption on a par with last year's levels, despite increasing its production volumes.

ANNUAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION BY SOURCE (GJ)

2017

2016

DIRECT CONSUMPTION

2,595,331

2,501,626

Energy from non-renewable sources

Natural gas

2,210,737

2,090,125

Fuel oil

5,124

10,649

Diesel

459

514

Gasoline

5

7

Self-generated energy from cogeneration

Thermal energy

227,052

231,552

Electricity

151,954

168,779

ANNUAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION BY SOURCE (GJ)

INDIRECT CONSUMPTION

2,853,325

2,852,398

Electricity

2,251,749

2,229,554

from non-renewable sources

1,036,988

1,291,300

from renewable sources

1,214,761

938,253

Thermal energy 

590,016

609,561

from non-renewable sources

590,016

609,561

from renewable sources

0

0

Energy for cooling

11,561

13,283

from non-renewable sources

11,561

13,283

from renewable sources

0


0

ENERGY CONSUMED PER TONNE OF FINISHED PRODUCT (GJ/t)

2017

2016

Energy consumed (GJ/t)

3.13

3.14

The rational, efficient use of energy resources, and increasing recourse to energy from renewable sources with GO (Guarantee of Origin) certification, has enabled Barilla Group to keep its emissions of greenhouse gases at similar levels to those recorded the previous year. 

65% of electricity purchased from the grid comes from renewable sources with GO certificates

Greenhouse gas emissions

During the year, the Group continued its initiatives aimed at reducing its use of road transport in favor of means of transport with lower environmental impact. In Sweden and Germany, for example, Barilla increased the percentage of products shipped by train, thus reducing its emissions of greenhouse gases by more than1,600 tonnes over the year.

Barilla's vehicle fleet modernization plan also plays an important role in its strategy for reducing polluting emissions. For example, the Group reached a significant milestone on the logistics front during European Sustainable Mobility Week, when it extended its vehicle fleet with 3 new road tractors fueled by liquid natural gas. The new vehicles will reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by 70%, carbon dioxide emissions by 15% and particulate emissions almost completely, compared with an equivalent diesel-powered vehicle. 

The Group's vehicle fleet renewal process also led to the purchase of 83 hybrid vehicles, integrating an internal combustion engine with an electric motor, which reduce carbon dioxide emissions by almost 40% compared with the use of conventional vehicles. In parallel with its purchase of hybrid vehicles, Barilla also completed the installation of 31 charging points in the parking area at the Pedrignano plant.

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS BY SCOPE

2017

2016

Scope 1 (t CO2 eq)

185,492

180,148

Emissions from fossil fuel use 

150,816

143,100

Emissions from proprietary cogeneration plants

34,676

37,048

Scope 2 (t CO2 eq)

193,687

197,033

Indirect emissions attributable to electricity consumption

98,659

98,570

Indirect emissions attributable to heat energy produced by external cogenerators

94,903

98,318

Indirect emissions attributable to cooling energy produced by external cogenerators

125

144

Total

379,179

377,181

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS PER TONNE OF FINISHED PRODUCT  

2017

2016

Greenhouse gas emissions (t CO2eq)

0.22

0.22

-29% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions attributable to finished product compared with 2010

Water consumption

Barilla also strives to improve its environmental profile through the responsible use of water resources. Over the years, the Group has therefore implemented specific projects for reducing water consumption at its production plants. These have reduced the company's water requirement per tonne of finished product by 3% compared with 2016 and by 23% compared with 2010.

water consumption by source

 

2017

2016

From wells (m3)

1,375,655

1,453,925

From public water mains (m3)

985,641

936,333

Total

2,361,296

2,390,258

water consumption per tonne of finished product
20172016
Water consumption (m3)1.361.40

23% reduction in water consumption attributable to finished product compared to 2010

waste water by destination 

 

2017

2016

To surface water (m3)

211,637

206,924

To sewer system (m3)

674,802

662,186

Total

886,439

869,110

Waste production

Barilla sets up projects designed to encourage the reduction of waste production and the recovery of waste material instead of its disposal. Careful management of the production process and methods of processing of raw materials have enabled Barilla to reduce its waste production compared with the previous year, despite an increase in production volumes.

waste production by type

2017

2016

Non-hazardous waste (t,)

28,214

28,303

Hazardaus waste (t,)

416

687

Total

28,630

28,990

waste produced per tonne of finished product

2017

2016

Waste produced (t.)

0.0164

0.0170

waste produced by destination

 

2017

2016

Non-hazardous waste (t.)

28,214

28,304

Recycling

26,576

26,244

Disposal

1,638

2,060

Hazardous waste (t.)

416

687

Recycling

351

596

Disposal

65

91